All Scientists are Sceptics ~Professor Bob Carter

Whenever someone asserts that a scientific question is “settled,” they tell me immediately that they don’t understand the first thing about science. Science is never settled. Dr David Deming

Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of the science of climate change is the lack of any real substance in attempts to justify the hypothesis ~Professor Stewart Franks

A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf

Friday, 8 March 2013

China Backing Away From Carbon Tax Start

During an on-line Q and A session in  July last year (LINK) PM Gillard was quized on the tax she had said we would not have.

Ms Gillard said that around the world other nations were moving to cut carbon pollution with Australians joining 850 million people around the world who live with a carbon pricing. 
“500 million Europeans live with carbon pricing and 200 million Chinese(sic)."
The European carbon tax market has a crisis with prices falling below A$6.30 (Link).

As to PM Gillard's "200 million Chinese" living with a carbon tax, it had not started when she made that statement. Was she misinformed? Or was it yet another lie?

Today Bloomberg report that: (link)

China will wait until after this year to introduce a tax on carbon, deferring to concern that economic growth might suffer, a government researcher said.

The nation eventually expects to introduce a levy of 5 yuan to 10 yuan (80 cents to $1.61) per ton of carbon, Jia Kang, head of research at the Ministry of Finance, said in Beijing yesterday. The tax, proposed in China’s latest five-year plan, was intended to apply to carbon emissions from fossil fuels, KPMG International said in a May 2011 report.

The carbon tax is “still in internal discussions,” as there is “obvious opposition,” Jia said without identifying the opponents. 
There is a distinct difference between Australia's $23 tonne (rising to $29 tonne) and Europe's $6 or China's proposed $1.60 tonne.

1 comment:

  1. I would place money on the fact china wont introduce a a tax on carbon, it clearly knows it economy will go into meltdown if it did and exports would be ruined. It just wont happen. There strategy will be to wait and see, as is their culture and allow science to either support or deny the climate change myth and then act or not act. In the meantime the rest of the world will suffer a tax that will not have any effect and our manufacturing will cease and China will pick up the world slack. China is too smart.

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