Warming world temperatures could be mainly Earth’s natural rebound from the Little Ice Age


Syun-Ichi Akasofu (赤祖父 俊一 Akasofu Shun'ichi?, born December 4, 1930, SakuNagano, Japan) is the founding director of the International Arctic Research Center of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), serving in that position from the centre's establishment in 1998 until January 2007. Previously he had been director of the university's Geophysical Institute from 1986. (wiki)

Akasofu earned a B.S. and a M.S. in geophysics at Tohoku UniversitySendai, Japan, in 1953 and 1957, respectively. He earned a Ph.D in geophysics at UAF in 1961. Within the framework of his Ph.D. thesis he studied the aurora. His scientific adviser was Sydney Chapman. Akasofu has been a professor of geophysics at UAF since 1964.
Akasofu was director of the Geophysical Institute from 1986 until 1999, during which time the Alaska Volcano Observatory was established and Poker Flat Research Range was modernised. He went on to become the first director of the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) upon its establishment in 1998, and remained in that position until 2007. The same year, the building which houses IARC was named in his honour.
Akasofu has served as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research (1972–74) and the Journal of Geomagnetism & Geoelectricity (1972–present), respectively. Furthermore, he has served as a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Planetary Space Science (1969–present), the Editorial Advisory Board of Space Science Reviews (1967–77), and the Editorial Committee of Space Science Reviews (1977–present). As a graduate student, Akasofu was one of the first to understand that the northern aurora was actually an aurora of light surrounding the North Magnetic Pole.

Syun-Ichi Akasofu recently gave a talk, “The Forthcoming Ice Age,” at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He thinks we humans are perhaps living in a period of warmth between cold periods and we consider it normal. Mankind’s effects on climate, he said, are a minor act in a much grander play.
Syun-Ichi Akasofu came to Alaska from Japan in 1958 to study the aurora. He became a worldwide expert and transitioned to people-and-budget management as director of the Geophysical Institute and later the International Arctic Research Center. He was essential in the birth of the latter, now a major UAF institution, by bringing in funding from Japan in the late 1990s.

Akafuso does not agree with current commentators who base their theories on the last few decades.

Akafuso is an ISI highly cited reporter. (link)

Akufuso's thoughts:
  • Global warming from 1975 on is real, he said, and he agrees that carbon dioxide levels are increasing dramatically. But he thinks warming world temperatures could be mainly Earth’s natural rebound from the Little Ice Age, a period from AD 1200 to 1850 when during some winters the Thames River froze in London and so did New York Harbor.

And where are we going:

“The public should be aware that we are at the peak of this change (the warm recovery from a past ice age),” he said. “We are luckily at the peak of an impulsive heat input.”As for today being different than yesterday, he said it is the natural state of things.“Climate change is happening all the time,” he said. “We should respect nature and its power.”

Comments

  1. This, of course, makes way too much sense for it to be reported by the conventional media. Only hdire calamities and predictions are mentioned.

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    Replies
    1. LOL - so true! have you been to www.realclimatescience.com ? check out what they have done with their time machine, making a cyclical graph look almost linear - it's criminal..

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  2. Actually there are several solar Flux cycles. One is at an 11 year repeat.
    The three hottest years on record took place on the down slope of that cycle.
    We have four years after which the cycle will rise again. The forcing of those magnitude peaks and lows are not concidered significant relative to CO2 or methane in 2017 comcentrations

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    Replies
    1. Indeed, "It's the Sun Stupid" plus I believe orbital mechanics..

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    2. Oh wait - you are a true believer? I retract my response.

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  3. Warmest year where I live was 1931.

    ReplyDelete

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