All Scientists are Sceptics ~Professor Bob Carter

Whenever someone asserts that a scientific question is “settled,” they tell me immediately that they don’t understand the first thing about science. Science is never settled. Dr David Deming

Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of the science of climate change is the lack of any real substance in attempts to justify the hypothesis ~Professor Stewart Franks

A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf
A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - See more at: http://thepeoplescube.com/lenin/lenin-s-own-20-monster-quotes-t185.html#sthash.aTrSI3tG.dpuf

Wednesday, 12 March 2014

Lobsters Like Warming Water

A paper by Styf et al published in Ecology and Evolution  reports that their findings indicate that embryonic Norwegian Lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) would do well in warmer, less alkaline ocean.
Our results thus indicate that this species would benefit from global warming and be able to withstand the predicted decrease in ocean pH in the next century during their earliest life stages. 
Embryonic response to long-term exposure of the marine crustacean Nephrops norvegicus to ocean acidification and elevated temperature.
Ecol Evol. Dec 2013; 3(15): 5055–5065.
Published online Nov 15, 2013. doi:  10.1002/ece3.860

Abstract

Due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our oceans have gradually become warmer and more acidic. To better understand the consequences of this, there is a need for long-term (months) and multistressor experiments. Earlier research demonstrates that the effects of global climate change are specific to species and life stages. We exposed berried Norway lobsters (Nephrops norvegicus), during 4 months to the combination of six ecologically relevant temperatures (5–18°C) and reduced pH (by 0.4 units). Embryonic responses were investigated by quantifying proxies for development rate and fitness including: % yolk consumption, mean heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption, and oxidative stress. We found no interactions between temperature and pH, and reduced pH only affected the level of oxidative stress significantly, with a higher level of oxidative stress in the controls. Increased temperature and % yolk consumed had positive effects on all parameters except on oxidative stress, which did not change in response to temperature. There was a difference in development rate between the ranges of 5–10°C (Q10: 5.4) and 10–18°C (Q10: 2.9), implicating a thermal break point at 10°C or below. No thermal limit to a further increased development rate was found. The insensitivity of N. norvegicus embryos to low pH might be explained by adaptation to a pH-reduced external habitat and/or internal hypercapnia during incubation. Our results thus indicate that this species would benefit from global warming and be able to withstand the predicted decrease in ocean pH in the next century during their earliest life stages. However, future studies need to combine low pH and elevated temperature treatments with hypoxia as hypoxic events are frequently and increasingly occurring in the habitat of benthic species.
What was done
The three Swedish scientists exposed berried Norway lobsters (females carrying fertilized eggs on the undersides of their abdomens) to four months of "the combination of six ecologically relevant temperatures (5-18°C) and reduced pH (by 0.4 units)," during which time they studied embryonic development of the species "by quantifying proxies for development rate and fitness including: % yolk consumption, mean heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption, and oxidative stress."

What was learned
Styf et al. report that (1) "the rate of yolk consumption per day, as a measure of embryonic development rate, significantly increased with temperature," that (2) lower pH "had no effect on development rate," that (3) "pH had no effect on heart rate," that (4) "there was no interaction between pH and temperature," that (5) "there was no significant effect of temperature on oxidative stress when analyzed independent of embryonic age," that (6) "there was a significantly higher level of oxidative stress in the control embryos compared with the embryos developed in low pH," and that (7) they "observed no mortality nor abnormalities."

Embryonic response to long-term exposure of the marine crustacean Nephrops norvegicus 

Embryonic response to long-term exposure of the marine crustacean Nephrops norvegicus 

Embryonic response to long-term exposure of the marine crustacean Nephrops norvegicus 

3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. From one of the authors of the lobster paper - our work implies that lobsters may thrive in a future ocean, and it does NOT say that climate change is a hoax.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Neither does the above report. As to climate change, we believe that climate changes.

    However, the hoax is that runaway global warming is caused by man's emissions of CO2. Man's CO2 emissions amount to 0.0016% of the atmosphere and although atmospheric CO2 is rising, there has been no global warming for 17 years and 9 months.

    Thanks for your comment!

    ReplyDelete





All serious comments published after moderation.
Comments should be polite, and respect all views.
No bad language. Spam never makes it!